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What to Consider from a Legal Standpoint If You’ve Experienced Workplace Discrimination as a School Teacher

By | 2018-03-22T01:53:46+00:00 March 21st, 2018|

Has teaching students may have been your passion for the longest time? Good teachers are hard to find, and they should be appreciated by their school districts. Your goal of educating young minds is likely why you decided to focus on education in your academics and your career.

Now that you’re a teacher, it should feel good to pursue your passion of making a difference one student at a time, except you’ve found you’re being discriminated against by your school district.

Regardless of their exact reasons for treating you differently, here are some things to consider from a legal standpoint if you’ve experienced workplace discrimination as a school teacher, in case you want to pursue legal action against the organization.

1.) Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protect you from gender- or ethnicity-based discrimination.

Everyone, including you, should have equal employment opportunities, no matter their gender or ethnicity. As a school teacher, you can protect yourself from being discriminated against by your school district because of your gender or ethnicity by invoking Title VII and Title IX. Both Title VII and Title IX also protect you from being sexually harassed by fellow school teachers.

2.) The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 protects you from being discriminated against if you’re older than 40 years of age.

You may be over 40 years old right now, and yet you still want to teach more students as you strongly feel that you’ve acquired a vast amount of knowledge that might go to waste if you don’t continue to teach.

If your school district terminates your employment as a teacher on the mere basis of age, you can take legal action against them under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967. It’s then entirely up to the school district themselves to prove that your age wasn’t the only factor that led to your firing.

3.) The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 protects you from being discriminated against if you’re pregnant.

Perhaps you are pregnant right now, and your school district has decided to deny you the job promotion that you’ve been asking for. Or perhaps they demoted you to a lower-level teaching position or even dismissed you outright and you suspect it is because of your pregnancy.

If your school district committed any of the discriminatory behaviors mentioned above against you, you can take legal action against them under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978.

Being a teacher should be fulfilling, as you get to impart your knowledge and skills to students who may decide to become teachers themselves in the future. However, that sense of fulfillment doesn’t exist at all for you if you’re experiencing workplace discrimination because of your gender, age, or some other reason.

No matter why you’ve been treated differently from the rest of your colleagues, you can mull over the above considerations from a legal point of view if you’ve experienced workplace discrimination as a school teacher and discuss with a lawyer how you plan to take legal action against your school district.